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Swarms of cicadas emerging in Midwest

Thread in 'Off Topic Discussion' started by RodgerGeorgia Tellefson, May 20, 2007.

  1. RodgerGeorgia Tellefson

    RodgerGeorgia Tellefson Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    CHICAGO - Coming soon: Brood XIII. It sounds like a bad horror movie. But it's actually the name of the billions of cicadas expected to emerge this month in parts of the Midwest after spending 17 years underground.



    The red-eyed, shrimp-sized, flying insects don't bite or sting. But they are known for mating calls that produce a din that can overpower ringing telephones, lawn mowers and power tools.



    Brood XIII is expected across northern Illinois, and in parts of Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana. Cicadas live only about 30 days as adults, and their main goal is mating.



    They don't harm humans, although they are clumsy and might fly into people. Birds, squirrels and pets, especially dogs, love to eat them, and they are high in protein.



    "They're going to have quite a meal. It's going to be like Thanksgiving for them," said Tom Tiddens, supervisor for plant health care at the Chicago Botanic Garden.



    They are periodical cicadas, which are only found in the eastern half of North America. The annual, or dog-day cicadas, that appear every summer are common around the world.



    The last massive emergence of periodical cicadas was in 2004, when Brood X emerged after 17 years underground in parts of 15 Eastern states. Some broods emerge after 13 years.



    As nymphs burrowing underground, cicadas suck sap from tree roots. Almost all members of a group, or brood, burst from the ground within a couple days of each other.



    They quickly climb the nearest vertical surface to molt and unroll their wings. In some heavily wooded areas, as many as 1.5 million cicadas per acre will crowd onto trees, expert say.



    "It's one of the greatest insect emergences on Earth," said Daniel Summers, an entomologist at The Field Museum.



    A single male's shrill courtship call can reach 90 decibels, equivalent to a kitchen blender. That could sour plans for outdoor events over the next few weeks.



    Ravinia Festival, a 103-year-old music festival held north of Chicago, revised its schedule to avoid classical musicians having to compete with the insects, said festival president and CEO Welz Kauffman.



    Check that link below for the rest of the story...
     
  2. Scott Heckler

    Scott Heckler Well-Known Member 2nd Gen Owner V8 Engine

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    You should then see the Killer Cicadas to follow. They are large wasp that their sole purpose is to search out the cicada, sting it and carry it back to their "nest" which is holes dug in the ground. They lay an egg on top of the cicada and close up that part of the "nest". The male Killer cicada just flies around the nest while the female does all the work. The killers will not hurt you at all as long as you stay out of their way.
     
  3. Gary DiPietroSr

    Gary DiPietroSr Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    This happened in Maryland about 20 years ago. We were down there for my nieces wedding. Those thing were flying all over.
     
  4. Sandy Curry

    Sandy Curry Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    West Virginia was part of that 2004 swarm. I remember driving down our country road in my Sport Trac with the windows up and the radio on. I thought there was something wrong with the truck since I could still hear this crazy buzzing when I turned the radio off. Then I rolled the window down and OMG those bugs were loud! :wacko:
     
  5. Rich Stern

    Rich Stern Administrator 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    Was visiting a friend's farm in Missouri about ten years ago, and they had an overlap of two different broods that year. It was so loud, it was painful to be within twenty feet of an infested tree. Really neat to watch, though.
     
  6. Jon OData

    Jon OData Well-Known Member 2nd Gen Owner 4 Wheel Drive V6 Engine

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    I wonder if they'll hit in PA. I remember when I was kid, the 17 year locusts came in 1969 or 1970, we were sweeping up huge piles of them at every street corner (then we'd ride our bikes over them:lol: ). Even the next time they hit they weren't nearly as bad.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2007
  7. Scott Heckler

    Scott Heckler Well-Known Member 2nd Gen Owner V8 Engine

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    Johnny - we had some last year, here in Langhorne. I would not call it a swarm . . . but many killer cicadas around to remind you.
     
  8. MH Ariola

    MH Ariola Member

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    Forget the noise, driving in Maryland in 2005, when those dang things hit the windshield they're so big and there are so many that I had to pull over to clean them off. I could bearly see!
     
  9. Jon OData

    Jon OData Well-Known Member 2nd Gen Owner 4 Wheel Drive V6 Engine

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    The last time we had them, maybe 3 or 4 years ago, I was playing in a local benefit golf tournament and they left brooms on the greens so you could sweep a path to the hole for your ball. It wasn't like the green was covered, but you almost never had a clear shot to the cup without a few in your way. The birds like them.
     
  10. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Member

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    Jon take some white paint next time .Paint the one thats closes to the cup for a birdie .
     

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