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CCW gun choice

Thread in 'General Information' started by Brett Hartwig, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. Brett Hartwig

    Brett Hartwig Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    Whats everybody prefer for Concealed Carry? Brand, model, caliber, pistol/revolver etc.
     
  2. H D

    H D Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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  3. Richard L

    Richard L Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner

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    freeport,

    I carry a Ruger LCP 380 with LaserMax. I have a custom made wallet holster by Uncle George (Austin, TX), that I carry in my back pocket like a wallet. I thought that it would be uncomfortable sitting on a gun, but you don't really sit on it because it higher on the hip.



    I also have a Bersa 380 Thunder which is what I used for qualifying for my CCW. It's a great gun and a nearly identical copy of the Walther PPK (what James Bond carried...LOL)



    In addition I have a small Jennings J-22, which is even smaller than the LCP. Yes, the Jennings is a cheap, unreliable, and inaccurate gun. But if you put about 250 rounds through the barrel to break it in, it becomes more reliable. Accuracy within 20 yards is good since that is where you are most likely to have to use it. I use CCI Mini-Mag hollow point ammo, which packs a pretty good punch for a 22LR.



    I have now been looking at the Beretta Pico 380 and the Beretta Nano 9mm. Both are only slighly larger than the LCP but a very thin flat profiles...which is a plus for concealed carry.



    Another factor to consider is the ammo. Sometimes ammo in certain calibers can be very difficult to find. With the popularity of small CCW guns, 380, 9mm, and 40 cal are often out of stock. This seems to be a bigger problem with the 380. Some ammo manufacturers only make one run of 380 ammo for the whole year. That leads to some people hoarding ammo, which quickly sells out and you have to wait months to buy ammo.



    If you do not already have your CCW license yet, check your state laws since some require that you carry the same type of weapon that you qualified with...ie: If you qualified with a revolver, you can only carry a revolver, and if you qualified with an automatic, you may carry either a revolver or an automatic (that's how Texas CCW license works)



    ...Rich

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 18, 2015
  4. H D

    H D Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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  5. Dre L

    Dre L Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    You have to find the balance. Find a shop that will let you try different combinations of holsters and pistols until you find one that you're willing to carry regularly, otherwise it's pointless. It has to be undetectable, otherwise you'll be disarmed and it's pointless.



    Most importantly, you need to practice the **** out of it. The key words you said here were SHTF, and that means good enough for the circumstances at hand. You use your CCW to get to your guns.



    The bottom line is if you're trained with a decent POS CCW, vs a trained / untrained assailant, you're still not going to pull your CCW unless you have absolutely no other choice in the matter. This is not the gun you'd prefer, this is the gun you'll have. It still surprises me how many people consider the CCW their first option, when it should be the last. Still, you should practice with it like it's the only option, and train to control yourself in the situation.



    edit: As for choice, can't go wrong with baby glock 9mm, but you might need to adjust to it. the ratios of cost-to-use-to-features are a major consideration. AKA Kimber taste, Glock budget.
     
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  6. Jackson Ellis

    Jackson Ellis Active Member 2nd Gen Owner V8 Engine

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    Keltec .380
     
  7. EddieS'04

    EddieS'04 Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner 2 Wheel Drive V6 Engine

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    A freind just got the new Ruger LCP/s-9. He likes it.
     
  8. Richard L

    Richard L Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner

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    Eddie,

    I think you are referring to the Ruger LC9s. I agree with your friend, I like it too. I just have not decided between the Beretta Nano or the Ruger LC9s. Both are small light weight subcompact 9mm.



    ...Rich
     
  9. Nick Miller

    Nick Miller Active Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    Glock 26 with Hornady critical defense ammo

    [Broken External Image]:
     
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  10. H D

    H D Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner V6 Engine

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    .
     
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  11. Jon OData

    Jon OData Well-Known Member 2nd Gen Owner 4 Wheel Drive V6 Engine

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    Taurus PT-111 9mm. Plastic body and it's a little smaller and lighter than the average 9mm. I keep it loaded with hollow points.

    As my gun expert uncle told me, "A lot of people want to carry a 44 Mag like Dirty Harry but it ends up not doing you any good because it's so flippin' heavy that you'll end up leaving it at home."
     
  12. Robert Caffyn

    Robert Caffyn Well-Known Member 2nd Gen Owner V8 Engine

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    Springfield XDs, .45 cal. Small and very deadly. :fire:
     
  13. Richard L

    Richard L Well-Known Member 1st Gen Owner

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    I agree with JohnnyO and his uncle. Concealed carry guns need to be small enough to easily conceal yet strong enough to get the job done when needed.



    That usually means something in the 9-10mm range or smaller. In most cases, the gun will be used at very close range...probably 10 ft or less...perhaps much less...and at that range, almost any gun is accurate enough and deadly enough to get the job done.



    Smaller and lighter weapons with less kick-back and plenty of ammo available at the trigger are often better choices for concealed carry weapons. My main carry gun is a Ruger LCP 380. I also alternate with every other round being a hollow-point for stopping power, followed by a high-velocity fully jacketed round for penetrating power. I also occasionally carry a small 22 LR Jennings with CCI Mag high-velocoty hollow points. Many people do not give the 22LR much credit, but I can assure you, that you nor anyone else want to take a 22LR hollow point anywhere in their center mass !



    I was trained that two quick shots at the center mass were preferred, and regardless of the caliber, will stop almost anyone. Alternating the rounds in the magazine in a smaller caliber will give you the stopping power and the penetration without all the kick-back of the larger caliber guns...It also makes for a more accurate second shot.



    45's certainly have the stopping power, and with the new polymer frames are getting lighter and smaller, but for me, they are just not there yet. Perhaps in another year or two, I might find a 45 worthy of concealed carry. The biggest problem for the 45 to overcome is the kick-back...and the smaller and lighter the gun the harder it is to control the kick-back and get your shots on target.



    ...Rich









     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 30, 2015

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